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Tagalongs: Twitter Hashtags Amplify Conference Experience

Hashtagging can be an effective way to generate buzz surrounding conferences, or other important events. Hashtags are dedicated words or phrases preceded by a number, or pound, sign (#) used to relate posts for specific conferences and/or sessions. Conference or event participants (now, potentially, including those persons following along on Twitter) can add the appropriate hashtag to their tweets to get in on the wider conversation. Hashtags are aggregated through Twitter search, allowing interested persons to follow the conversation stream.

For example, if you were running the greatest legal conference ever, some tweets, including a potential hashtag, might look like this: "@jaredcorreia just made YET ANOTHER brilliant observation at #greatestlegal!  How does he do it?!?!"; or, like this: "Wish I was at #greatestlegal :(, BUT enjoying following along on Twitter :)".

Hashtagging allows for, what is, essentially, crowdsourcing of conferences and events. Strictly offline conferences served exclusively as platforms for broadcasting the ideas of scheduled speakers; and, all of that good murmur amongst the crowd was generally lost. No longer: that all now appears in hashtagged conversations, along with lots of other stuff, including concurring and dissenting views, and links out to further resources. Participating in conference hashtagging (before, during and after the event; whether contributing to or following the stream), can significantly amplify your conference experience, even if you can't make it there in person.

Tip courtesy of Jared Correia, Law Practice Management Advisor, Law Office Management Assistance Program.

Published June 2, 2011

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